Posts

What people with IBD should know

I'm often asked, “What would you tell someone recently diagnosed with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)?” So, this is what I think you should know! Look out for clickable links in this blog, leading to more detailed information! For many, a definitive diagnosis is a massive relief after a long period of being unwell. This does not mean that acceptance is easy, after all, you have just been diagnosed with a chronic disease which has no cure. Do NOT panic, we’ve got this, life is not over! It is worth pointing out that no two IBD patients’ lives are the same. The disease does not always manifest in the same way, and the fact that a treatment works for one person does not mean it will work for another. This makes IBD notoriously difficult to treat. That said, some IBD patients may have one flare, find the right medication straight away and never have another, and that is fantastic! For the rest of us, being diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease or Ulcerative Colitis may mea

Pred | Common side effects and why I won’t take it again

Your relationship with yourself: Processing your emotions & body confidence tips

BLOG CHANGES | I will always be a work in progress

One step forward… Two steps back

HealthCARE anxiety

Where’s my psychological support?

What I wish people understood about life with IBD

Series wrap-Up | How my ulcerative colitis impacted my life

Series | How ulcerative colitis impacted my romantic relationships

Identifying your IBD triggers

Mental health awareness week | Ostomy edition

Series | How my ulcerative colitis impacted my mental health

How I felt when I found out that I needed a stoma

Stress? Anxiety? Panic? Whatever it's called, I don't like it!

The Additional Stress of Moving and Busy Times

KTMY | The Chronically Living Series: Sahara, Founder of #IBDSuperHeroes

Grieving for my Pre-UC Life

Feeling lonely is more normal than you think

My journey to stoma acceptance – 11 years, 7 surgeries and 3 ostomies later

Self-care series | Looking after your mental health